The Northeastern Society of Plastic Surgeons

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Effectiveness of a pediatric-specific catheter-associated urinary tract infection reduction program
Patrick H. McKenna, MD, Thomas G. Leffler, MPH.
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.

Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) can increase morbidity, mortality, healthcare costs, and hospital length of stay. While there are many adult-based CAUTI reduction programs, few are adapted specifically to the unique needs of the pediatric population. We aimed to assess the efficacy of a pediatric-specific CAUTI program.
Methods: Pediatric-specific, evidence-based interventions were implemented over a seven month period. Interventions included education overhaul, product and policy improvement, implementation of a pediatric bladder management protocol, and electronic alerts for removal of placed catheters, among other preventative measures. The overall goal of the interventions was to better assess the need for catheter placement and ensure timely catheter removal. A pre-post surveillance was performed to test the impact of the interventions on reduction of CAUTI and Foley rates in hospitalized patients on the medical/surgical and pediatric intensive care units. Rates of CAUTI and Foley use were collected for 12 months pre (1/13-3/14) and post (5/14-4/15) implementation of all interventions. Pre and post rates were then compared.
Results: There was a 78% reduction in total CAUTI and 16% reduction in Foley days after implementation of the interventions.
Conclusions: This unique approach has been successful in decreasing pediatric CAUTI and Foley use at our institution. Hospitals may benefit from the implementation of this evidence-based CAUTI program that focuses on the distinct needs of pediatric patients.


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