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Perceptions and attitudes of learners towards video recording of their operative performance for assessment of surgical skills
Yuding Wang, MD1, Bruce Li, MD2, Luis Braga, MD, PhD3, Edward D. Matsumoto, MD MEd4.
1Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 2University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, 3McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton, ON, Canada, 4McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

BACKGROUND: With the advancement of competency-based education, there has been increasing interest in video data collection in the operating room (OR) as a means for objective surgical skill assessment. However, studies evaluating feasibility of this new assessment method have had limited focus on the learner side. Our objective was to survey surgical trainees on their perceptions to videotaped surgical performance and its use in education and assessment.
METHODS: A previously piloted online survey was distributed to all Canadian surgical program administrative staff and program directors with the request to be internally distributed to residents. All participants were anonymous. The survey was administrated over a 4-week time frame.
RESULTS: A total of 138 of 548 responses were received (23.7% response rate). All surgical specialties and years of training were represented. 89% had no experience having their own operative skills recorded, while 66% reported the use of online surgical video recordings for surgical preparation. Most trainees (92%) were receptive to having their operative skills recorded for assessment, stating recordings would depict a true representation and be more objective than current methods. 95% felt that videotaping oneís operative performance could play a role in their learning; yet 52% indicated these should not be part of summative evaluation. A total of 66% expressed levels of concern with litigation issues, while 70% were not concerned with personal privacy. Trainees expressed that video recording in the OR would not be intrusive (55%), nor would it affect the "true" OR environment (56%).
CONCLUSIONS: The majority of surgical trainees were receptive to having their surgical skills recorded in the OR for educational purposes and felt that recordings would serve as an objective representation of surgical skills. Provided patient and trainee consent, surgical residency programs are encouraged to incorporate and increase accessibility of operative video recording of its residents.


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